Bufferbloat and Beyond: How we reduced delays in the Linux networking stack by orders of magnitude

Bufferbloat is when a bottleneck router in the network reacts to congestion by queueing up too many packets. The result is long delays that are felt as interruptions by the end user: suddenly, the video skips, the game lags, or the web site stops responding. This talk explains what we have done to fix this in Linux, an ongoing effort over the last several years.

While bufferbloat can happen everywhere, the main culprit is often home routers and WiFi access points inside the local network. Since these devices often run Linux, it is possible to upgrade their firmware to achieve better behaviour. Thus, the Linux networking stack has been at the forefront of the efforts to combat bufferbloat over the last several years, with fixes to all layers.

In this talk I will present an overview of the efforts, show some pretty graphs of the benefits, and provide some hints for how to reap the benefits on your own network.


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  • Sunday Aug. 11 13:00 - 14:00 at Speakers Tent

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